Tag Archives: Programming

Hackference 2017

Well, it has been almost a year since my previous post here, very much living up to the “occasional blogger” title on my Twitter profile.

I didn’t think there was going to be a Hackference 2017, what with it being ‘the last Hackference’ last year, but here we are.

Annoyingly, I made it to Euston station at 6:44am on the Friday. The train I booked was scheduled for 6:43, and annoyingly left on time, so I had to buy another ticket. £58 poorer than I was hoping to be that day, I got on the next train and still made it to The Studio (the venue for the day) on time.

I’m not going to say much about the talks: they were all really good, inspiring everyone to think differently about programming, design, and to try out some of the new Web technologies.

IMG_1686

Here’s Oxford’s very own Ben Foxall demoing a combination of the Web Audio API, WebGL and Nexmo’s voice API. In short, a visualisation of a phone call between Ben and his mum, happening in real time!

The next day was the hackathon. 24 hours of working on whatever you want, with whomever you want, from midday on Saturday to midday on Sunday. There were a few sponsors who ran challenges to help focus the direction of the hacks, including Microsoft. Microsoft were encouraging the use of their Cognitive Services APIs – a collection of machine learning features making it easy for developers to add image recognition, OCR, speech-to-text etc. to their own applications; and they would award a prize to the team with the best use of their APIs.

What follow are the slides from my presentation at the end.

Slide text: Hi I'm Dan and I made a thingA Slack message from me: "Anyone stuck for ideas? I want to play around with some of the Microsoft image recognition stuff"

Quite early on I was looking for a team to hack with Microsoft’s Cognitive Services, but I might have put people off when I said some of it would be in PHP.

Added to my Slack message: "Mostly in JavaScript, but may involve some PHP later on. Anyone want to pair up?"

Anyway I carried on on my own and ended up creating this site, Is It A Bench?

Screenshot from my hack "Is It A Bench?"

The idea is pretty simple, you can upload a photo to the service and it will tell you if it thinks it’s a photo of a bench, along with the text in any inscriptions.

I imagine there may be a few of you who are wondering:

Slide text: Why?

Well, I’ll tell you.

This is Terence. You may recognise him from the conference on Friday, or from speaking at Hackference last year.

A screenshot of OpenBenches.org, showing a map of the UK

He made this website called Open Benches.

Another screenshot from OpenBenches.org

The idea is you can upload geotagged images of benches with inscriptions and they will appear on a map.

Screenshot of @openbenches Twitter account

As soon as someone uploads these images, the website will instantly post them on Twitter.

That poses a potential problem. The Internet is not a nice place and some people could upload photos that clearly aren’t benches. It would also be easier to enter in the text of inscriptions if there was some way of processing the images with OCR before they are published.

I set about making a content filter. I uploaded a photo to my service which Microsoft’s vision API decided was adult content and described it as “a close up of a tattoo”. I’ll leave it to you to imagine what it was.

"isAdultContent": true, "text": "a close up of a tattoo"

When my site detects inappropriate content, it responds accordingly.

Screenshot of my website. At the bottom is a question "Safe for uploading?" Followed by "Hell no. Get this off my website"

It was around this time when Joe Nash stuck a message on the Slack group looking for people to play Laser Tag. It has been such a long time since I last played it, and I couldn’t resist leaping at the offer.

It was a lot more exercise than I was expecting that weekend. Also I’m terrible at Laser Tag – I was consistently the lowest scorer, but it was such good fun anyway!

When I got back I got started on the text extraction. I spent a good 20 minutes working out why OCR wasn’t working. Turns out I can’t spell OCR.

A POST request to an endpoint with 'orc' instead of 'ocr'

I was pretty much finished with the proof of concept early on, so after some interesting chats with some of the attendees, I even managed to get some sleep!

The next morning was spent making a couple of performance optimisations, prepping the demo and appreciating the fantastic food for lunch. As a last minute idea I tried making a JSON response to work with photos from the Open Benches website. I didn’t finish that bit in time.

I presented a live demo of what I had, and introduced the Open Benches website explaining how I could integrate the functionality.

Screenshot from Is It A Bench. A close-up of a plaque is correctly tagged with 'bench'

Most of the photos that I’d submitted to Open Benches in the past were correctly identified as benches – even the close-ups of plaques which really surprised me.

A correct transcription of the text on the plaque

Sometimes the text was extracted perfectly, even keeping lines and capitalisation…

A less accurate transcription of a slightly-more-difficult-to-read plaque

But sometimes it wasn’t so good!

After my demo, I tweeted about its existence. Terence seemed to love it!

Once everyone had finished their demos, the sponsors left to decide on the winners. While I didn’t win the prize from Microsoft, I did win a Raspberry Pi Zero from the recruitment company Harvey Nash! During the conference, Harvey Nash had the brilliant idea of giving playing cards to the attendees. Two packs were given out and your goal was to find the other attendee with the matching card to win a prize. It was a great icebreaker and I’d love to see that more in the future.

The hackathon had everyone from students to veteran hackers; all of the genders, ethnicities and operating system preferences; and it was wonderful to see everyone simply being excellent each other. (Apparently that’s some sort of reference to Bill and Ted; if only I knew what Bill and Ted was…)

Here’s to the next one!

Advertisements

Hackference 2016, Part 2 – The Hackathon

<- Part 1: the conference
On Saturday, once everyone had got a good night’s ‘sleep’ (our hotel was just next to a loud club which only got quiet after 3am), we walked over to the Impact Hub.

Before I get started, I’m using the word ‘hack’ in the non-malicious form. Tabloids use the word ‘hacker’ to describe someone with malicious intent who steals data or takes down websites (for example, this article in the Mirror). We use it to describe someone who thinks the best way of learning is by doing. A hackathon is just a group of sleep-deprived developers playing with something new.

The event itself was free – paid for completely by the wonderful sponsors.

Before the hackathon started, not many people knew what they wanted to make (including me). Luckily the sponsors got a chance to inspire us with their products and announce their prizes. There was a variety of companies attending, each with some cracking prizes for the teams making best use of their services.

Continue reading

Hackference 2016, Episode IV: A New Hackference

Last weekend saw me heading to Birmingham to attend Hackference, a 3-day event for all sorts of programmers. There was a conference on Friday at the Electric Cinema, followed by a 24-hour hackathon at the weekend.

I’d never been to Hackference before, so I didn’t know what to expect. It’s a shame it’s probably going to be the last one though.

What follows is my account of the weekend, aided by plenty of tweets. The weekend was so jam-packed with stuff to blog about, so I’m going to split it up in two.

Part 1 – the conference

The Electric Cinema was a really cool venue. There were two screens, so two talks could happen at the same time. This was good because we could choose the talks that interested us most, but bad because most of the time I wanted to see both! Continue reading

Realtime hacking with JSOxford

Yesterday I went to a hack day run by JSOxford. The theme was ‘realtime’, i.e. using Web technologies to update a site automatically from a data source.

Since I had no experience with realtime technologies before I came, I didn’t want to make anything too ambitious! I just wanted to learn the basics so that I could make something useful in the future.

Continue reading

Code Golf at Bath Ruby User Group

Golf: normally, unless it’s of the ‘Crazy’ or ‘Adventure’ variety (is there a difference?), I will stay well away from it. That’s mainly because my arms don’t swing and it involves quite a lot of standing and waiting around outside. However, yesterday evening I played a game of Code Golf.

The game goes like this – there are 9 problems (or ‘holes’ if you will), and you need to write a method to solve each one. The problems are fairly simple (I was reminded of first year programming), but the aim was to solve the problems in the fewest number of characters possible. This meant if you stood any chance of winning, you would have to squash your code into something compact and unreadable.

Continue reading

Bath Hacked guest blog

I wrote about my hackathon experience on the Bath Hacked website, but I thought I’d copy it over to this blog too.

What did you make?

We created a website that aims to help people decide who to vote for in the next general election. It visualises the results of past elections and gives unbiased information about the candidates standing for the next election.

Which data sources/tools did you use?

Our main data source was the BANES website, which contained all the data for the past election results. We also looked at the websites of the candidates for next year’s election.

What were the challenges?

One of the main challenges was collecting the data. Chris spent many hours trawling through the many pages of the council website to collect the data and put it into a spreadsheet, which was then uploaded to the data store.

What would you do to improve your project further?

Currently we only have past election data for 2011 in the Bath Constituency. We would like to add data for North East Somerset and for other years to help users discover trends.

We were also intrigued with the problem of tactical voting. We’d like to create an opinion poll to collect information on how people would like to vote if they didn’t feel the need to vote tactically. Perhaps this will be able to influence people’s decisions.

Where can we find it?

VoteTub isn’t online right now, but we plan on continuing development of the website. This blog post will be updated and we’ll tweet a lot when we bring it live.

Team

Bath Hacked 2.1: VoteTub

Photo taken by Jon Poole (I think). More photos here.

This weekend I took part in my first ever weekend-long ‘hackathon‘, where a bunch of developers group together to create solutions to make Bath better. The event took place at the Bath Guild. We were encouraged to take publicy available data about the city and turn it into a resource that members of the public could actually make sense of.

I formed a team with two other hackathon newbies, Christopher and Cliff. Christopher wasn’t a coder but had an idea for a project, Cliff had experience as a front-end developer, and I was a recent graduate with almost no experience building a thing from scratch.

Christopher’s idea was to build a website that would help people decide who to vote for in future elections. It would list the candidates with links to various forms of social media, and give unbiased policy information. It would also look into the past, providing results of previous local elections, and also the future. An idea was to try to tackle tactical voting. The site would ask visitors who they were going to vote for, then who they would ideally like to see in power. It would then show them the summary of what other people replied. We thought it would be interesting to see if this data would affect people’s decisions.

Continue reading

YouFeed updates

YouFeed logo

So this happened the other day:

That’s Edwin, the CEO of feedly, saying my YouFeed site is “brilliant”. He wants to integrate the functionality of YouFeed into feedly mini (the Chrome extension). He said that he was considering making feedly mini open source, to allow developers like me to add our own functionality to make feedly better for everybody.

Continue reading

YouFeed (AKA a thing that I made on the Internet)

TL;DR: Easily subscribe to YouTube channels and playlists on Feedly by using YouFeed, a little Web app that I made.

YouFeed screenshot

I think I started coding this Web app around exam time of my final year at uni. I just wanted to make something simple that would be really useful to people, and what’s simpler than taking a string of text and returning a slightly bigger string of text?

That’s what YouFeed does.

The problem

Let’s say you’re using YouTube to subscribe to an artist’s channel. When that YouTuber uploads a new video, a link to that video appears on the YouTube homepage. But we might not want to watch that video right now – instead we might want to watch it next week. A week passes and you’ve forgotten about the video because it’s no longer on your YouTube homepage.

Instead, you might want to subscribe to that artist using Feedly.

Continue reading