Tag Archives: JSOxford

Hackference 2016, Part 2 – The Hackathon

<- Part 1: the conference
On Saturday, once everyone had got a good night’s ‘sleep’ (our hotel was just next to a loud club which only got quiet after 3am), we walked over to the Impact Hub.

Before I get started, I’m using the word ‘hack’ in the non-malicious form. Tabloids use the word ‘hacker’ to describe someone with malicious intent who steals data or takes down websites (for example, this article in the Mirror). We use it to describe someone who thinks the best way of learning is by doing. A hackathon is just a group of sleep-deprived developers playing with something new.

The event itself was free – paid for completely by the wonderful sponsors.

Before the hackathon started, not many people knew what they wanted to make (including me). Luckily the sponsors got a chance to inspire us with their products and announce their prizes. There was a variety of companies attending, each with some cracking prizes for the teams making best use of their services.

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Hackference 2016, Episode IV: A New Hackference

Last weekend saw me heading to Birmingham to attend Hackference, a 3-day event for all sorts of programmers. There was a conference on Friday at the Electric Cinema, followed by a 24-hour hackathon at the weekend.

I’d never been to Hackference before, so I didn’t know what to expect. It’s a shame it’s probably going to be the last one though.

What follows is my account of the weekend, aided by plenty of tweets. The weekend was so jam-packed with stuff to blog about, so I’m going to split it up in two.

Part 1 – the conference

The Electric Cinema was a really cool venue. There were two screens, so two talks could happen at the same time. This was good because we could choose the talks that interested us most, but bad because most of the time I wanted to see both! Continue reading

Train Text-imonials

My train times site http://trntxt.uk is just over a year old. While I’ve picked up a handful of users, it’s fair to say that it’s not exactly gone mainstream. And that’s fine – it’s difficult to get people excited about a website that only has one function and doesn’t look visually appealing (by design).

I wanted to present trntxt at JSOxford‘s Show and Tell in May, but I knew that a black and white website wouldn’t make much of an impact. So I wanted to jazz up my talk with enthusiasm. Enthusiasm and memes.

Normally, the format of JSOxford’s Show and Tell session enables people to show off their personal projects by opening the live site in a new tab, without any slides, in about 2 minutes. And while this would have been OK, I really wanted to demonstrate the functionality on a smartphone, which is kind of difficult to do when there are about 50 people to present to.

Instead I used my slot to demonstrate trntxt in more of a ‘lightning talk’ fashion.

17 slides in 3 minutes.

trntxt presentation at jsoxford

Photo by Ryan Brooks

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Imojify! (bookmarklet edition)

At one point, when making my Imojify JavaScript library, I decided to make a bookmarklet which turns text into emoji whenever possible.

I mean, we all love emoji right? We use it all the time on social media. So I thought why not try and put it in more places on the Web? I thought I’d demo it to the folks at the most recent JSOxford meetup.

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Imojify: my first JavaScript library

In which Dan finds a project other than Trntxt.uk to blog about, and says ’emoji’ 11 times.

TL;DR: I made Imojify, a library that converts emoji in :colon: notation into their graphical equivalents. It’s on GitHub, NPM and Bower.

On Monday morning I had an idea for a brilliant JavaScript library, but I couldn’t do anything with it because I had to go to work then I had a choir rehearsal. I got back from choir at 10pm with the idea still in my head along with some very catchy Christmas songs.

I had a working (but buggy) prototype by 1am.

The idea was a library that could convert colon notation emoji into their PNG image equivalent. For the uninitiated, colon notation is often used in chat services such as Gitter and Slack. It consists of a word or phrase wrapped inside a colon, such as :angry: or :stuck_out_tongue:. The big benefit of this sort of emoji is accessibility – if the picture isn’t rendered for whatever reason (e.g. for a blind person using a screen reader), it is still possible to understand what the author meant. Continue reading

JSOxford NodeBots Day

“The problem with hardware is that there is no version control” – Marcus Noble

JSOxford’s NodeBots day marks one year since I first used JavaScript (ish). At last year’s event I took an Arduino and used the johnny-five library to control it using Node. It was fun to make, but wasn’t really that impressive.

This time round, JSOxford had a bunch of Espruino Pico boards and plenty of hardware to hack around with, including continuous servos and wheels.

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Realtime hacking with JSOxford

Yesterday I went to a hack day run by JSOxford. The theme was ‘realtime’, i.e. using Web technologies to update a site automatically from a data source.

Since I had no experience with realtime technologies before I came, I didn’t want to make anything too ambitious! I just wanted to learn the basics so that I could make something useful in the future.

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TDD is still alive (JSOxford Code Retreat)

Last Sunday I went to The Jam Factory in Oxford with 20 other programmers for ‘Code Retreat’ – an event organised by JSOxford as part of their Summer of Hacks.

The aim of the event was to encourage us to code properly through a variety of techniques. We weren’t expected to finish the set tasks, but the code produced during the tasks should be perfect. Emphasis was put on code quality rather than quantity – different than other hack events.

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