Buzzer.mobi: Another Pandemic Project

On the 3rd July I announced my latest side project, https://buzzer.mobi, that would help people play socially distanced games remotely. The Coronavirus lockdown was eased in the UK the day after. I wish I’d started this project a bit earlier, but better late than never!

The tradition of the Monday night virtual pub quiz with my friends had continued throughout the lockdown, and a few weeks after the first quiz I hosted, it was my turn again.

Back by popular demand, I put together a longer Catchphrase round with a little help from the data collected by my previous side project, catchphrase.dpope.uk. It helped me identify the highly rated puzzles so that I could put together an enjoyable round more quickly.

I was going to use BuzzIn.live for the buzzers again, but some updates to the site changed the behaviour around how players can get frozen/unfrozen, so I thought I should just make my own version instead. How hard could it be?

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UX features of buzzer.mobi

I don’t have any UX qualifications, but I like to think that sometimes I have good ideas around what makes a good user experience. I’ve been to several talks about browser features and Web APIs, and I apply what I learn to my projects. In this post I describe some of the nice features I’ve added to buzzer.mobi.

  1. Game ID prompt
    1. Input type
    2. Placeholder text
    3. Maximum length
    4. Keyboard hints
  2. Remembering details
  3. OpenGraph tags
  4. Low latency button presses
  5. Keyboard-only buzzing
  6. Haptic feedback
  7. Conclusion

Game ID prompt

Let’s start with some plain HTML, and the text box that accepts the Game ID. What attributes can we add to this input element to make it more useful?

<input type="text" name="gameid" id="gameid-input">
Continue reading “UX features of buzzer.mobi”